Raspberry Pi picked to save the endangered rhino

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TINY LOW-COST COMPUTER the Raspberry Pi is being used to help protect rhinos in Kenya.

Rhinos are endangered, but are protected at Kenya's Tsavo National Park. The park is using Raspberry Pi computers to build a virtual safety net to help protect them.

We heard that Raspberry Pi computers would be heading to Kenya earlier this summer when the plan was awarded a gong in Google's Impact Challenge competition.

The Global Challenge asked people to pitch in with positive proposals and was judged by a panel that included Google VP for Northern and Central Europe Matt Brittin, Sir Richard Branson and Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

The Rhino Pi plan won the fourth medal called the People's Choice, and the Raspberry Pi Foundation was pleased about the successful pitch by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

"These life-saving cameras will help stop the slaughter of rhinos, which has seen more than 1,000 killed in Africa in just eighteen months," said ZSL's field conservation director Professor Jonathan Baillie as he spoke about plans to save the lives of hundreds of animals.

"Over the next two years we plan to cut poaching in Kenya's Tsavo National Park by 50 per cent and help park rangers protect endangered rhinos, elephants, and more, before it's too late."

The Raspberry Pi systems will be used to control a number of live cameras that will help spot criminal activity like poaching and pass that information on to law enforcement.

Professor Baillie told the BBC that motion sensors and low power consumption made the Raspberry Pi the obvious choice. µ

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