Raspberry Pi pre-orders hit 350,000

  • Tweet  
  • LinkedIn  
  • Facebook  
  • Google plus  
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to  

MINIATURE COMPUTER Raspberry Pi has been pre-ordered 350,000 times, it has been revealed, with the next batch set to start shipping in May.

Corby distributor RS Components has told The INQUIRER that it has now received 250,000 pre-orders, up from the 220,000 it reported last week. What's more, Element14, the other Raspberry Pi distributor and part of the Premier Farnell Group has revealed that it has reached 100,000 pre-orders, bringing the total number of people interested to 350,000.

"We appreciate customers are desperate to get their hands on a Raspberry Pi and want to reassure them that we are working on this as quickly as we can," said Mike Buffham, product director at Element14.

We reported last week that given such unprecedented demand, the £22 PC was fetching over the odds at auction web site Ebay, with buyers bidding over £140 to get their hands on the device.

Those who have pre-ordered at the retail price shouldn't be kept waiting too long for the credit card sized computer. Although an exact date when more devices will be shipped is still to be set, Raspberry Pi founder Eben Upton told us on Monday that units should begin arriving within the next week. µ

 

  • Tweet  
  • LinkedIn  
  • Facebook  
  • Google plus  
  • Send to Kindle
  • Send to  
Visitor comments
Add comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
More on Hardware
London Mayor Boris Johnson

Bojo wants his own personal drone to deliver his Beano

A flight of fancy

eshopping-cart

Black Friday and Cyber Monday tech round-up: Deals from eBay, Maplin, Game, Bitcoin and Amazon

A run through some of the gadget bargains planned for 28 November and 1 December

MIPS by Imagination logo

Imagination brings virtualised Linux security to the Internet of Things

Embedded hypervisor runs multiple operating systems in complete isolation

edsac

Historic Edsac computer takes its first tentative steps back to life

National Museum of Computing is working like it's 1939